Posts Tagged ‘ ultrasound

A Linear Service Model=Continuous Improvement Part 1

So now that you know what a Linear Service Model is, what’s next? What makes a Linear Service Model so much better than a Global Service Model? Its simple: The ability to foster a community culture of continuous improvement within our Pregnancy Centers. The ability to understand what is not working and the ability to fix it.

As the pioneer in creating and implementing the only repeatable and measurable LSM for a PRC in the world you’ve come to the right place. At CompassCare we understand that no pregnancy center is perfect. We also understand that we executives serve because of our passion for the mission. It is our mission that drives us to excel. We know that there is not a sane woman alive who actually wants to have an abortion. She comes to our organization saying things like, “I’m stuck, trapped . . . I’ve got no other choice. I need to have an abortion.” Our mission is to erase the need for abortion in the mind of every woman.

As executives we are responsible to answer to our boards and ultimately to our communities that have invested so many resources in our organizations. We are responsible to give an answer as to how those valuable human and financial resources have been used to bridge the gap between a community with abortion and a community without. We need to give an answer as to how we delivered on the mission to reach and serve women seriously considering abortion helping them to have their babies.

Metrics Are a Bridge to an Abortion Free Future

And how do we as executives communicate the results our organizations are getting? And perhaps more importantly, how do we get better at what we are doing? This is what the business world calls the ‘Return On Investment’ or ROI. Talking to other pregnancy center executives is good. Attending Pregnancy Center related conferences can be good. But those activities don’t tell you how your organization is performing nor can they pinpoint exactly what your organization should do to get better.

The only thing that can help your organization make the right changes in right way is measuring the right things. Remember the old adage, “What gets measured gets fixed?” The question for us becomes, “What should we measure?” To see a CompassCare Master Metrics report designed to help OT executives get a good picture of how their organization is performing on the mission click on the following link: OT Network YTD Master 11.1.10

If your organization is determined to help reverse the abortion trend in your community then two of the most important categories to measure are; 1) Reaching the right women and 2) Serving them in the right way. Understanding and learning to use metrics will empower you as an executive to lead your pregnancy center into greater effectiveness than you ever imagined possible. In fact, one of CompassCare’s OT executives recently said to a group of executives in training, “If I didn’t have these metrics anymore, I’d close our doors.  It’s how I know that what we’re doing is working!”

Metrics: The Key to Success

For more information about CompassCare’s comprehensive advanced Linear Service Model (LSM) training click here.

Update:  See Linear Service Model = Continuous Improvement, Part 2

Virtuous Leadership and a Linear Service Model Part 1

Virtuous Leadership and a Linear Service Model (LSM) Part 1: As goes the Executive so goes the organization.

Virtuous Leadership=Focused Organization

In the process of both running a medical PRC and helping others to develop and operate their medical PRCs it occurred to me that there are certain questions all of us PRC Executives need to have answered.  Questions like:
-How can we get more abortion-minded women to call our center?
-How can we get more abortion-minded women who call to schedule an appointment?
-How can we get more of those who schedule an appointment to show?
-How can we get more of the women we see to have their babies?
-How can I as an executive get more control over the organization and out of the daily grind of wondering just how effective our counseling methods really are and know for sure?
These questions are linked to each other and often if you answer one you solve another.  The good news is that the answers to these questions are available.  Even better than that many center executives are experiencing the freedom and comfort that comes with knowing that their organization is accomplishing the mission of reaching and effectively serving women at risk for abortion better than they ever dreamed they could right now.  The next few posts are written to address these questions.  It is my hope they will help propel you as an executive as well as the organization which you lead to a higher level of effectiveness than you ever let yourself believe was possible.

In the process of thinking through how to convey the answers to the most pressing questions every PRC executive seems to share, something occurred to me; there is only one guarantee for success.  I have seen many organizations face the difficult questions, make difficult decisions about how to answer those questions, and go on to greater effectiveness at reaching and serving women facing unplanned pregnancies, while others do not.  At first glance the organization that ultimately succeeds at that worthiest of all goals versus the one that does appear the same.  But after having observed and worked with both types of PRCs over the years, a key difference began to emerge between them.  But that key difference was not manifesting as the usual suspects such as a specific type of operation.  It was not that one offered a specific service like ultrasound technology and the other did not. Nor was it dependant on access to money.  It was not even that the successful organizations had developed a strategic plan, because unsuccessful ones had too.  What we began to notice was that while the organizations that were effective and gained greater effectiveness at reaching and serving women at risk for abortion were the ones that were committed to sticking to their strategic plan and creating systems of service to intentionally improve (LSM), there seemed to be an underlying driving force to that commitment.  These organizations had the fortitude to do the really, really hard work of facing their brutal reality and creating a new reality through focused action.  Incidentally it is difficult to have consistently focused activity without a strategic plan driving the development of the approaches that are taken to accomplish the mission. But the specifics of a strategic plan seem to be secondary.

Admittedly, I was a little surprised at the revelation that the specific details of a strategic plan were secondary to just simply having and religiously sticking to that plan.  The end result is almost always some level of a step by step Linear Service Model. You must forgive my bias toward the value of the CompassCare LSM.  However, once my proverbial eyes adjusted to the light of this new revelation we started asking ourselves:  “What made some organizations able to pursue a strategic plan while others seemed content to let their strategic plan, if they had one, sit on the shelf?”

Over time we began to observe a common element in pregnancy centers that continued to get better and better at their mission.  At the heart of the organizations that were able to purse a strategic plan and enjoy the resulting benefits of a more or less linear service process for reaching and serving the high risk abortion-minded woman was the activity of a particular person; the executive.

We began to realize that the activity of a PRC, over the course of time, reflected the behavior and expectations of the person who occupied the  executive director position.  In fact this realization became so obvious that we began using the following phrase in all our PRC Linear Service training:  “As goes the executive so goes the organization.”

In part 2 we will discuss the role of personal virtue in executive leadership and what its practical implications are for developing and implementing an effective linear service model (LSM).

Check out the results of a pregnancy center in Omaha, NE after their executive, Michelle Sullivan, decided to implement a Linear Service Model by clicking here.

Part III: Ethical Standards for Serving Abortion-minded Women

What do therapy dogs have to do with pregnancy care centers? Therapy dogs have proven to raise morale of long term hospital patients which in turn improves the patient’s overall health. But are their times when there are NO DOGs ALLOWED? If you don’t know your ethical standards anything goes and it will become increasingly more difficult to determine what should and should NOT be done when serving clients/patients. Without know your ethical standards and how they apply it is very easy for good intentions to degenerate into poor or unethical performance.

Dogs in a Hospital? Where to draw the line.It is the same way with serving women facing unplanned pregnancy. There are things to do and things not to do. There are times to do them and times not to do them. This post is the third of a four part series of knowing your pregnancy center’s ethical standards of care.

Informed Decision-making:

To promote informed decision-making organizations should help to answer the 3 basic questions every woman needs to have answered in order to determine the outcome of her pregnancy:

A. Am I really pregnant? It is possible to not have a viable pregnancy and have a positive home pregnancy test.

  • A woman needs a medically definitive diagnosis of pregnancy confirmation using ultrasound technology or blood tests.

B.  How far along in the pregnancy am I? The further along in the pregnancy a woman is increases the complexity of her options.

  • A woman needs an ultrasound scan to determine the exact gestational age of the baby. Gestational age determines the type of abortion procedure she would be eligible to receive.
  • All abortion procedures are medical procedures. Therefore each abortion procedure has different costs and different risks associated with them.
  • Gestational age is important to know in terms of providing medically accurate information about fetal development.

C.  Is it important to know if I have a sexually transmitted disease (STD)? STDs can negatively impact future reproductive health if left untreated.

  • Some STDs if left untreated prior to an abortion procedure increase the risk of infection which can put a woman’s reproductive health in jeopardy.
  • Testing and treatment for the most common STDs, Gonorrhea and Chlamydia, is essential to prior to an abortion to safeguard a woman’s reproductive health.

To learn more about how to apply ethical standards through a linear service process that holds all staff and volunteers accountable to those standards go to www.compasscaretraining.org.

Update:  See Part IV:  Ethical Standards for Serving Abortion Minded Women.

Latest from Omaha, NE

Recently Michelle Sullivan and Barb Malek in Omaha, NE sent CompassCare an encouraging summary of the results they have been seeing regarding reaching more women at-risk for abortion after implementing a linear patient service platform. It reads as follows:

2007 vs. 2008 statistics

For the 2nd quarter (April, May, June) of 2008 we saw 224 patients for pregnancy tests (This does not include retests. Some were patients we had seen in the past, but this was a new pregnancy for them.) Of these, 131 were positive tests, and 93 were negative. This means that 58% of all our tests were positive tests. (I wish I could break that down into those that were strongly abortion minded, but, unfortunately, that would be a lengthy process, and I do not have time. With our new database, we will know this information easily. However, we all know from experience that the number of those patients has risen quite dramatically.)

By comparison, in the 2nd quarter of 2007, we saw 172 patients for pregnancy tests. Of these 85 (or 49%) were positive. This is an increase of 23% more patients, and, even more importantly, an increase of 35% more positive pregnancy tests over 2007.

Lastly, I would like to compare June 2007 to June 2008. In June of 2007, we saw 55 total pregnancy test patients. In June of 2008, we had 54 positive tests, and saw a total of 90 patients. (In June of 2006, we only saw 27 patients for new pregnancy tests, with only 12 positive tests. By the way, these were the statistics that drove us to seek out a new way of doing things. As a result, we found CompassCare. God is good!)